Scotties Toy Box

April 6, 2012

Twitter Scammers Prey on Draw Something Popularity | Online Scams & Identity Theft | Computer Viruses & Malware | SecurityNewsDaily.com

Filed under: News — Scottie @ 15:17

Twitter Scammers Prey on Draw Something Popularity | Online Scams & Identity Theft | Computer Viruses & Malware | SecurityNewsDaily.com.

Twitter Scammers Prey on ‘Draw Something’ Popularity

29 March 2012 | 12:31 PM ET | by Matt Liebowitz, SecurityNewsDaily Staff Writer

10-Year-Old Girl Gives Birth to Daughter – ABC News

Filed under: News — Scottie @ 14:51

10-Year-Old Girl Gives Birth to Daughter – ABC News.

10-Year-Old Girl Gives Birth to Daughter

The unnamed girl from Manaure, a town in the Colombian Department of La Guajira, arrived at the hospital in tears and “enormous pain” from the contractions, according to Univision’s Primer Impacto. She reportedly delivered her daughter, who weighed 5 pounds, by cesarean section.

Experts say a C-section delivery for such a young mother is not unusual.

“The baby’s head needs to come through a bony outlet. But in a young girl, the pelvis may not be ready or big enough to deliver a baby,” said Dr. Kimberly Gecsi, an OB/GYN at UH Case Medical Center in Cleveland.

Extremely young mothers also have a higher risk of pregnancy-induced high blood pressure known as preeclampsia, and their babies are at risk for fetal growth restriction, according to Dr. Frederick Gonzalez, a clinical professor of obstetrics and gynecology at NYU Langone Medical Center.

“These girls are not ready to be pregnant. Their bodies are not mature,” said Gonzalez. “They may be able to get pregnant, but being able to have a baby is a whole other situation.”

The new mom is a member of the Wayuu people, an indigenous tribe in northern Colombia. The age of the father is unknown, but police can’t press charges because the tribe has its own jurisdiction, according to local reports.

“We’ve already seen several cases [of pregnancy] in girls of the Wayuu ethnicity,” Efraín Pacheco Casadiego, director of the hospital where the girl gave birth, told RCN La Radio noticias. “When in fact [the girls] should be playing with dolls, they are having to care for a baby. This is shocking.”

Pregnancy can occur as soon as a girl starts ovulating, which is happening at ever younger ages.

“The average age girls in the country start menstruating is about 12 and a half, but that age keeps dropping,” said Gecsi, adding that the age is even lower among Hispanic girls. ”But only about 13 percent of Hispanic girls menstruate younger than 11. And for them to have a sexual experience would be very unusual.”

Because ovulation precedes menstruation, girls can get pregnant before ever having a period.

“Typically, menstruation is the last thing that happens in puberty,” said Gesci, adding that girls typically go through a growth spurt and develop breasts and pubic hair before menstruating. “If you notice those things, you could be about to menstruate and you could get pregnant.”

U.S. News – Student booted from pageant over gay marriage remark

Filed under: News — Scottie @ 09:27

U.S. News – Student booted from pageant over gay marriage remark.

 

Student booted from pageant over gay marriage remark

 

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/39788177?launch=46964925&PG=MSVNA3&BTS=MSVNMB&height=429&width=600

A California high school student was disqualified from a school pageant after making a pro-gay marriage remark during the question and answer portion of the contest. KNBC-TV’s Vikki Vargas reports.

Kearian Giertz said he was being spontaneous and honest by responding to the question, “Where do you see yourself in 10 years from now?”

“And, I ended it with, hopefully, 10 years from now gay marriage will be legal in California, and I left it at that,” Giertz said.

With that comment, the Fullerton Union High School student was disqualified from the Mr. Fullerton pageant, an annual contest for senior boys that takes place at the California school’s Plummer Auditorium.

“Everybody started cheering him and then Mr. Abell came out and said, ‘Cut him, cut him,’” said student Isaac Fanti. “But he was just speaking his mind.”

Students are now questioning why Vice Principal Joe Abell would remove Giertz from the competition.

Within 24 hours, district officials sent a statement to parents saying no school rules were violated.

In the letter, they admit the matter was not handled appropriately and noted that the vice principal gave a personal apology.

“Currently, in the student handbook, there is nothing protecting students based on gender or sexual identity, which I’ve been campaigning for two years with no luck,” said another student Blake Danford.

Students began passing out letters to be handed to the vice principal, asking him the same question asked of Giertz.

“No one should have been offended. Nobody was,” Giertz said. “You don’t check your First Amendment rights at the gates of the school.”

US scientific study claims male dolphins are bisexual – PinkNews.co.uk

Filed under: News — Scottie @ 09:02

US scientific study claims male dolphins are bisexual – PinkNews.co.uk.

US scientific study claims male dolphins are bisexual

by  
29 March 2012, 5:02pm

Research scientists at the University of Massachusetts have concluded that male dolphins conduct intense social relationships and are found to engage in extensive bisexuality.

The researchers studied more than 120 bottlenose dolphins in Shark Bay, Western Australia, and discovered relationships of a considerably more complex nature than previously thought. Co-author of the study, Richard Connor, told Discovery News that the dolphins engaged in extensive bisexuality, combined with periods of exclusive homosexuality.

“I work on the male dolphins and their social lives are very intense. It seems there is constant drama. I have often thought, as I watched their complicated alliance relationships, that their social lives would be mentally and physically exhausting, and I’m glad I’m not a dolphin.”

Mr Connor’s team also discovered that dolphins pair-up or swim in groups of three in order to herd individual females during mating season.

The results ultimately found that most male dolphins are also members of “second order alliances” which contain between four and 14 males. One gang, with seven members, has been swimming together since 1995.

Mr Connor said that though the males are “capable of serious aggression,” they rarely fought and were not exceptionally territorial.

Even worse than SOPA: New CISPA cybersecurity bill will censor the Web — RT

Filed under: News — Scottie @ 09:00

Even worse than SOPA: New CISPA cybersecurity bill will censor the Web — RT.

Even worse than SOPA: New CISPA cybersecurity bill will censor the Web

Protesters demonstrate against the proposed Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and Protect IP Act (PIPA) outside the offices of U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) and U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) on January 18, 2012 in New York City (AFP Photo / Mario Tama)

(57.7Mb)embed video

TRENDS:SOPA

TAGS: LawInternetInformation Technology,USA

 

An onrush of condemnation and criticism kept the SOPA and PIPA acts from passing earlier this year, but US lawmakers have already authored another authoritarian bill that could give them free reign to creep the Web in the name of cybersecurity.

As congressmen in Washington consider how to handle the ongoing issue of cyberattacks, some legislators have lent their support to a new act that, if passed, would let the government pry into the personal correspondence of anyone of their choosing.

H.R. 3523, a piece of legislation dubbed the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (or CISPA for short), has been created under the guise of being a necessary implement in America’s war against cyberattacks. But the vague verbiage contained within the pages of the paper could allow Congress to circumvent existing exemptions to online privacy laws and essentially monitor, censor and stop any online communication that it considers disruptive to the government or private parties. Critics have already come after CISPA for the capabilities that it will give to seemingly any federal entity that claims it is threatened by online interactions, but unlike the Stop Online Privacy Act and the Protect IP Acts that were discarded on the Capitol Building floor after incredibly successful online campaigns to crush them, widespread recognition of what the latest would-be law will do has yet to surface to the same degree.

Kendall Burman of the Center for Democracy and Technology tells RT that Congress is currently considering a number of cybersecurity bills that could eventually be voted into law, but for the group that largely advocates an open Internet, she warns that provisions within CISPA are reason to worry over what the realities could be if it ends up on the desk of President Barack Obama. So far CISPA has been introduced, referred and reported by the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence and expects to go before a vote in the first half of Congress within the coming weeks.

“We have a number of concerns with something like this bill that creates sort of a vast hole in the privacy law to allow government to receive these kinds of information,” explains Burman, who acknowledges that the bill, as written, allows the US government to involve itself into any online correspondence, current exemptions notwithstanding, if it believes there is reason to suspect cyber crime. As with other authoritarian attempts at censorship that have come through Congress in recent times, of course, the wording within the CISPA allows for the government to interpret the law in such a number of degrees that any online communication or interaction could be suspect and thus unknowingly monitored.

In a press release penned last month by the CDT, the group warned then that CISPA allows Internet Service Providers to“funnel private communications and related information back to the government without adequate privacy protections and controls.

The bill does not specify which agencies ISPs could disclose customer data to, but the structure and incentives in the bill raise a very real possibility that the National Security Agency or the DOD’s Cybercommand would be the primary recipient,”reads the warning.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation, another online advocacy group, has also sharply condemned CISPA for what it means for the future of the Internet. “It effectively creates a ‘cybersecurity’’ exemption to all existing laws,” explains the EFF, who add in a statement of their own that “There are almost no restrictions on what can be collected and how it can be used, provided a company can claim it was motivated by ‘cybersecurity purposes.’”

What does that mean? Both the EFF and CDT say an awfully lot. Some of the biggest corporations in the country, including service providers such as Google, Facebook, Twitter or AT&T, could copy confidential information and send them off to the Pentagon if pressured, as long as the government believes they have reason to suspect wrongdoing. In a summation of their own, the Congressional Research Service, a nonpartisan arm of the Library of Congress, explains that “efforts to degrade, disrupt or destroy” either “a system or network of a government or private entity” is reason enough for Washington to reach in and read any online communiqué of their choice.

The authors of CISPA say the bill has been made “To provide for the sharing of certain cyber threat intelligence and cyber threat information between the intelligence community and cybersecurity entities,” but not before noting that the legislation could be used “and for other purposes,” as well — which, of course, are not defined.

“Cyber security, when done right and done narrowly, could benefit everyone,” Burman tells RT. “But it needs to be done in an incremental way with an arrow approach, and the heavy hand that lawmakers are taking with these current bills . . . it brings real serious concerns.”

So far CISPA has garnered support from over 100 representatives in the House who are favoring this cybersecurity legislation without taking into considerations what it could do to the everyday user of the Internet. And while the backlash created by opponents of SOPA and PIPA has not materialized to the same degree yet, Burman warns Congress that it could be only a matter of time before concerned Americans step up to have their say.

“One of the lessons we learned in the reaction to SOPA and PIPA is that when Congress tries to legislate on things that are going to affect Internet users’ experience, the Internet users are going to pay attention,” says Burman. H.R. 3523, she cautions, “Definitely could affect in a very serious way the internet experience.” Luckily, adds Burman, “People are starting to notice.” Given the speed that the latest censorship bill could sneak through Congress, however, anyone concerned over the future of the Internet should be on the lookout for CISPA as it continues to be considered on Capitol Hill.

Mystery

Filed under: Cartoons — Scottie @ 07:15

This is what Ron said almost 22 years ago….For about the same reason

Filed under: Cartoons — Scottie @ 07:11

Wizard of Id

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