Scotties Toy Box

January 22, 2020

Yes, for the people

Filed under: Cartoons, Economics, Fascism, Memes, Political, Questions, Reason — Scottie @ 08:10

January 21, 2020

Joe Biden Doubles Down On A Racist Myth About Black Parents

Filed under: Bigotry, Children, Criminal, Economics, Family, Fascism, News, Political, Questions, Race, Reason — Scottie @ 18:59

Not really a great way to pull in the POC vote we will need to win the 2020 election.   Please people wake up, Biden has passed his due date, he is not able to win and if we let the corporate media force him as our nominee we will lose badly to tRump.  Look I keep saying Biden is stuck in his prime age days.   The ideas of way back then were different.   He can not adapt to our reality today, to the things that what was thought to be real back then, is now known to be wrong.  He is frozen in the past and can not be in our present.   If he were to become president he would work like it was 1970’s to 1980’s.  That is horrible and would just bring in another Republican administration and stalemate of any attempt to move forward as a country.    Hugs

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/joe-biden-racist-myth-black-parents_n_5e2215a9c5b674e44b980327

The former vice president repeated a debunked trope about the racial achievement gap and blamed minority parents for the legacy of segregation.

In a long and often rambling interview with The New York Times published Friday, former Vice President Joe Biden responded to a question about the legacy of racism by blaming Black parents for the racial achievement gap.

In the third 2020 Democratic presidential debate, held in September, Biden had said that one way America could address the legacy of slavery and segregation was by bridging the “word gap” between white and Black children. “A kid coming from a very poor school, a very poor background, will hear 4 million words fewer spoken by the time we get there,” Biden said. He then recommended that Black parents play records at night to “make sure that kids hear words.”

Finally, he suggested that Black parents may not participate in their children’s schooling due to embarrassment about their own lack of education. Biden said he’d learned from his wife, a former school teacher, that poor parents “don’t show up because they’re embarrassed. They’re embarrassed the teacher’s going to say — and it’s hard to say, ‘Well, I can’t read.’”

While somewhat masked by his choppy delivery, Biden’s suggestion that Black parents are reluctant to participate in their children’s education and are responsible for the racial achievement gap has no basis in fact.

Biden’s comments on the “word gap” were bad, but his suggestion that Black parents are reluctant to participate in their children’s education was even worse. For decades, white politicians have blamed Black parents, rather than the legacy of racism, for disparities in achievement.

Studies have consistently found that Black parents are more likely than whites to value post-secondary education. Segregation, mass incarceration and poorly funded schools ― i.e. things that fall squarely under Biden’s responsibility as a politician ― play a larger role in exacerbating the racial achievement gap than parenting styles.

More at the link above.   Hugs

 

 

 

The Ministry Of Untruth What Donald Trump’s unending stream of lies has done to our White House, our country and us.

Filed under: Criminal, Economics, Fascism, News, Political, Questions, Reason — Scottie @ 18:09

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/trump-untruth-lies-false_n_5e0bac46e4b0843d360c94ea

As our president sat across from Volodymyr Zelensky in New York last autumn, he explained to the newly elected leader that he knew all about his country because, after all, he used to own the Miss Universe pageant, and one year the winner was from Ukraine.

“We got to know the country very well in a lot of different ways,” Donald Trump said.

It was, unsurprisingly, completely false. A Miss Ukraine had never won the Miss Universe title in the pageant’s 66-year history, including the 20 that Trump had owned it.

 

Indeed, on that day during his United Nations General Assembly visit, Trump also claimed:  “We have created the greatest economy in the history of our country.” Of the USMCA trade agreement: “It’s a great trade deal — the greatest we’ve ever had. NAFTA was a horrible trade deal. It replaces NAFTA.” Of Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi: “A lot of her members now are having second thoughts. They’re saying they’re in a very bad position.” Of his long-promised wall along the Mexican border: “And the wall is going up, many miles a week.” Of the WTO: “World Trade Organization was not one of the greats. Not one of the greats. That was the creation of China, which went like a rocket ship from the day they signed.” And of new automotive plants: “Many of the great Japanese companies, at my request, are now building their plants in the United States. … Big ones going up in South Carolina, Florida.”

Not a single one of Trump’s assertions was true.

Today’s economy is not the greatest economy in the country’s history, and has, in fact, over the past year been slowing down. Trump’s United States Mexico Canada Agreement is essentially the North American Free Trade Agreement with some minor tweaks. Pelosi was not losing support among her Democratic members. Not a single mile of new fence had been built someplace where there hadn’t already been a barrier. China did not create the WTO, and Toyota and Nissan are not suddenly building new plants here. Not in Florida. Not anywhere.

Much more at the link above.   Hugs

Year over year, inflation-adjusted wages rose 0% in 2019. 51% of workers got no raises

Filed under: Economics, News, Political, Questions, Reason — Scottie @ 06:10

This is not a great economy.   This is horrible and creating a serf class, a permanent working class who have nothing but hardship and labor  then die early while the wealthy enjoy long lives of privilege.    Hugs

All too rarely do we hear these days about two of most troublesome chronic problems—the number of rotten jobs and the percentage of low-wage jobs, with the Brookings Institution putting the latter at 44%.

One example was released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics last Tuesday, a report on real average earnings. “Real” as in adjusted for inflation. Most of the time we only hear in the media about changes in nominal wages, their face value. That fails to tell a key part of the story. As every minimum-wage earner knows, $7.25 in 2020 is not worth what it was in 2009, the last time the federal government reset the minimum. Inflation has since knocked down its buying power to $6.09.

 

For all employees, real average hourly earnings fell 0.1% from November to December 2019, seasonally adjusted, according to the bureau.That result came from a rise of 0.1% in average hourly earnings plus a rise of 0.2% in the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U). In addition, real average weekly earnings fell by 0.1% over the month because the average workweek didn’t change.

The year-over-year tally shows a bigger hurt. Real average hourly earnings rose 0.6%, seasonally adjusted, from December 2018 to December 2019. But those earnings have to be placed against the 0.6% fall in the average workweek. In other words, as the BLS puts it, this “resulted in essentially no change in real average weekly earnings over this period.”

Or more succinctly: wages were flat in 2019. And the situation is actually worse because including the gains of the top 10%-20% of earners skews the average upward.

Bankrate’s Financial Security Poll for December puts some flesh on that skew: 51% of American workers received no raise in 2019. That’s about 82 million people. In 2018, 62% got no raise—99 million workers.

Bankrate’s Financial Security Poll for December puts some flesh on that skew: 51% of American workers received no raise in 2019. That’s about 82 million people. In 2018, 62% got no raise—99 million workers.

More at the link above.   Hugs

 

 

In Historic Shift, Second Largest Physicians Group in US Has New Prescription: It’s Medicare for All

Filed under: Economics, Health, News, Political, Questions, Reason — Scottie @ 05:23

Although the United States leads the world in health care spending, it fares far worse than its peers on coverage and most dimensions of value. Cost and coverage are intertwined. Many Americans cannot afford health insurance, and even those with insurance face substantial cost-related barriers to care. Employer-sponsored insurance is less prevalent and more expensive than in the past, and in response, deductibles have grown and benefits have been cut. The long-term solvency of U.S. public insurance programs is a perennial concern. The United States spends far more on healthcare administration than peer countries. Administrative barriers divert time from patient care and frustrate patients, clinicians, and policymakers. Major changes are needed to a system that costs too much, leaves too many behind, and delivers too little.

The ACP’s detailed review of the current for-profit system—even with some of the improvements resulting from the Affordable Care Act (ACA)—found that “too many Americans are uninsured or underinsured” and that current spending is “high and unsustainable”—especially as other developed nations show their ability to achieve better or similar outcomes for less while offering universal, government-guaranteed coverage to all.

While acknowledging that a transition to Medicare for All could be “highly disruptive” to the healthcare system, the ACP said “single-payer financing approach could achieve [its] vision of a system where everyone will have coverage for and access to the care they need, at a cost they and the country can afford. It also could achieve our vision of a system where spending will have been redirected from health care administration to funding coverage, research, public health, and interventions to address social determinants of health.”

Medicare for All, the paper continued, could also “achieve other key policy objectives, including portability, lower administrative costs and complexity, lower premiums and cost sharing, lower overall health care system costs, better access to care, and better health outcomes, depending on how it is designed and implemented.”

According to an op-ed by Woolhandler and Himmelstein, also published in the Annals alongside the ACP’s new position paper, “Achieving universal coverage would be costlier under the “public choice” model the ACP co-endorses along with single payer.”

Unlike a public-private mix of coverage that the public option would represent, the pair write, a single-payer Medicare for All  would allow hospitals and doctors to “save billions on billing-related costs” each year, and those savings could be re-purposed “to expand care” to millions for less cost than the status quo.

More information at the link above.   The times they are a changin.   Hugs

 

 

Chris Hedges on America entering the “Trump Phase” of late capitalism

Filed under: Cartoons, Economics, Fascism, Greed, History, Memes, News, Political, Questions, Reason — Scottie @ 04:58

Taxpayers subsidize police settlements. We pay for their cruelty and murder

Filed under: Bigotry, Cartoons, Criminal, Economics, Fascism, Hate, Memes, News, Political, Questions, Race, Reason — Scottie @ 04:49

When taxpayer funds are used to pay fines and damage awards there is no penalty for the one who did the wrong action or crime.  There is no incentive to change their ways if it doesn’t cost them anything and they can push the cost off on others.   Hugs

getinvolvedyoulivehere:
“Make this law and watch how fast things change!
#PoliceThePolice #PTP
”
Taxpayers subsidize police settlements. We pay for their cruelty and murder.getinvolvedyoulivehere:

Make this law and watch how fast things change!

#PoliceThePolice #PTP

Taxpayers subsidize police settlements. We pay for their cruelty and murder.

 

Class warfare is nothing new

Filed under: Cartoons, Criminal, Economics, Fascism, Memes, News, Political, Questions, Reason — Scottie @ 04:37
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Class warfare is nothing new. #MLKDay2020

January 20, 2020

Making China great

Filed under: Cartoons, Economics, Memes, News, Political, Questions, Reason — Scottie @ 06:47

If tRump had not been born wealthy

Filed under: Cartoons, Economics, Funny Stuff, Memes, News, Political, Questions, Reason — Scottie @ 06:46

I still prefer Warren, but will easily vote for Sanders if he is the nominee

Filed under: Cartoons, Economics, Memes, Political, Questions, Reason — Scottie @ 06:44

Farmers refuse to cheer for Trump as he lies that he’s fighting for them to keep their land

Filed under: Economics, Food, News, Political, Questions, Reason — Scottie @ 06:07

Farmers refuse to cheer for Trump as he lies that he’s fighting for them to keep their land

As one viewer noted, there was noticeable silence when Trump mentioned land usage. It could be due to the fact that Trump is suing in court to take the land of farmers and ranches so he can build his border wall. For some, the land has been in their family since the founding of the state of Texas.

Trump was also caught in multiple lies and twisting of the truth. He claimed that under former President Barack Obama’s administration, farmer income fell. He didn’t mention that it topped out at the highest it’s ever been, as one viewer noticed.

He also didn’t address the costs he’s forced on farmers due to his tariffs with China. While Trump provided corporate farms with multiple bailouts, those who don’t run huge farms lost a lot of money and many were even forced to file for bankruptcy. Farmer suicides also saw an increase under Trump. Thanks to Trump’s tariffs, equipment costs also significanlty increased.

Never any money to help the people, it all goes to wealthy corporations

Filed under: Cartoons, Economics, Greed, Memes, News, Political, Questions, Reason — Scottie @ 05:59

25 people own the government

Filed under: Cartoons, Economics, Fascism, Greed, Memes, News, Political, Questions, Reason — Scottie @ 05:49

Turns out the Tea Party were just racists. The deficit hawks used bad faith. The wonks were stooges

Filed under: Bigotry, Cartoons, Criminal, Economics, Fascism, Greed, Memes, News, Political, Questions, Reason — Scottie @ 05:42
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Turns out the Tea Party were just racists. The deficit hawks used bad faith. The wonks were stooges.

To the surprise of no one.

26 richest people

Filed under: Cartoons, Criminal, Economics, Greed, Memes, News, Political, Questions — Scottie @ 05:33

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January 19, 2020

Unskilled labor

Filed under: Cartoons, Economics, Greed, Memes, News, Questions, Reason — Scottie @ 08:56

Open opportunities

Filed under: Cartoons, Economics, Education, Memes, News, Political, Questions, Reason — Scottie @ 07:14

We have a lot to lose

Filed under: Cartoons, Economics, Education, Fascism, Health, Memes, News, Political, Questions, Reason — Scottie @ 07:02

Why is K-12 totally acceptable for public funding, but anything after that considered insane?

Filed under: Cartoons, Economics, Memes, News, Political, Questions, Reason — Scottie @ 06:51
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Why is K-12 totally acceptable for public funding, but anything after that considered insane?

We pay for everyone to get educated until they are 18 for decades. Why not make it age 22?

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