Scotties Toy Box

January 18, 2020

South Dakota GOP bill would jail doctors for 10 years if they provide trans health care to minors

Please understand this is not about safety or helping kids, it is about erasing trans people.   Puberty blockers should be started for trans kids just  puberty starts.   They do no harm, they simply stop the effect of the hormones from affecting the  body to make / change gender characteristics.    This is important because that lets a person who is trans keep from looking like the wrong gender.   A trans girl wants and should be allowed to look like a female, not forced to look like a boy in drag.   Same with trans boys, they should be allowed to look like males.  The blockers do not harm as if they are stopped regular puberty begins.   It simply is delayed but the process starts and continues as it would if the blockers were not used.    No one is letting kids get vasectomies and sexual reassignment surgery.  It is a scare tactic just like the misinformation about puberty blockers.  This is all about hurting and stopping people from identifying as trans.  It is another case of legislators wanting to be between the patient and their doctor.   Hugs

https://www.salon.com/2020/01/18/south-dakota-gop-bill-would-jail-doctors-for-10-years-if-they-provide-trans-health-care-to-minors/

South Dakota has proposed 16 anti-trans measures in recent years. Now the GOP wants to imprison doctors

House Bill 1057 would make it a felony to prescribe puberty blockers and hormones to people under 18 years of age and bans surgeries like vasectomy and vaginoplasty.

The bill was introduced by Republican state Rep. Fred Deutsch and has already drawn more than 40 co-sponsors in the Republican-dominated legislature.

This part is just a lie.  The medications are not dangerous and are used all over the world and the US without complications.  Rep. Fred Deutsch is wrong and using debunked scare tactics to outrage people.

“Children need to wait until they’re mature to do it,” he said, arguing that the procedures and medications barred under the bill are “dangerous” because of the psychological and physical effects they have on young people.

 

Harvard psychiatrist Dr. Jack Turban, who researches the mental health of transgender youth, told NBC that it is “unsettling to see state legislators proposing that standard medical care, as outlined by The American Academy of Pediatrics, The American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and The Endocrine Society, should be a felony.”

The Endocrine Society and World Professional Association of Transgender Health both recommend puberty blockers and hormone treatments for transgender teens, though both organizations also recommend delaying surgeries until 18 years old. The report noted that only a quarter of transgender and gender non-conforming adults have reported undergoing transition-related surgery.

“Transgender kids, like all kids, deserve a chance to experience joy, to learn in a safe environment, to get the health care that they need, and to survive into adulthood,” said the ACLU’s Libby Skarin. “When the government proposes laws that would stigmatize them and undermine their care, they lose those opportunities.”

“The spate of anti-trans bills in South Dakota and elsewhere in recent years reflects an intentional strategy on the part of the anti-LGBTQ right wing,” wrote Gordon-Loebl. “Having lost the fight on gay marriage and recognizing the increasing national acceptance of lesbian gay and bisexual people, groups like [Alliance Defending Freedom] — alongside the Trump administration — have decided to pick off trans people, who are in many ways the most vulnerable and least protected members of the LGBTQ community.”

 

 

 

 

 

Expert: Georgia election server showed signs of tampering

Filed under: Criminal, Fascism, News, Political, Questions, Science — Scottie @ 09:04

Republicans do not want democracy.  They crave power and wealth.   Hugs

https://apnews.com/39dad9d39a7533efe06e0774615a6d05

 A computer security expert says he found that a forensic image of the election server central to a legal battle over the integrity of Georgia elections showed signs that the original server was hacked.

The server was left exposed to the open internet for at least six months, a problem the same expert discovered in August 2016. It was subsequently wiped clean in mid-2017 with no notice, just days after election integrity activists filed a lawsuit seeking an overhaul of what they called the state’s unreliable and negligently run election system.

Logan Lamb, a security expert for the plaintiffs, said in an affidavit filed in Atlanta federal court on Thursday that he found evidence suggesting the server was compromised in December 2014. Lamb said the evidence suggests an attacker exploited a bug that provided full control of the server.

Lamb also said he determined that computer logs — which would have been critical to understanding what might have been altered on or stolen from the server — only go back to Nov. 10, 2016 — two days after Donald Trump was elected U.S. president. Two years later, Brian Kemp won the Georgia governor’s race by a narrow margin over Democrat Stacey Abrams.

Additionally, Lamb found evidence that election-related files were deleted from the server on March 2, 2017, just after a colleague of his alerted KSU officials that the election server remained vulnerable to hackers.

The fact that the access logs were deleted suggests possible foul play, Lamb wrote.

“I can think of no legitimate reason why records from that critical period of time should have been deleted,” he said in his sworn statement.

The plaintiffs have accused state election officials of repeatedly and intentionally destroying evidence that could show unauthorized access to state election infrastructure and the potential manipulation of election results.

More at the link above.  This is serious election fraud and cover up.  Hugs

January 14, 2020

Testing a REAL Exoskeleton – the Comau MATE

Filed under: Health, News, Science, Things I like, You Tube — Scottie @ 15:19

I find this really interesting.   One of the things I struggle to do is hold my arms over my head.   The pain builds quickly to very intense.  Also to stand for any length of time my spine starts to really hurt badly.  Something like this would really help me.   But it really might be good for people much worse than I am, in the future could people without the ability to walk use something like this?  Could people who have to use a walker use this instead?   This really is an important part of human / science interaction we need to look into.   Oh yes the first few minutes are silly, but get beyond them to where he goes to the factory and shows what the suit really can do for workers.   Hugs

Taiwan’s single-payer success story — and its lessons for America

Filed under: Economics, Education, Health, News, Political, Questions, Reason, Science, Things I like — Scottie @ 11:36

There is much more information at the link, it is a long read but worth it.   Some good things, and it explains some of the harder choices.  It is do able and it has really improved the health of the people.   But there are strains and it will need price increases, which from a US view point are inconceivably low.    The say a co-pay is about 12 dollars.   Remember though our country is much wealthier.   Anyway I found the article fascinating.   Hugs

https://www.vox.com/health-care/2020/1/13/21028702/medicare-for-all-taiwan-health-insurance

Diabetes, alcoholism, and heart disease are common problems among the Taroko. The indigenous people have endured displacement, forced assimilation, and discrimination over the centuries. They are also poorer than the ethnically Han Chinese who make up most of Taiwan’s population.

But they never have to worry about one thing: their health care. In Taiwan, everybody is covered. The Taiwanese health care system is built on the belief that everyone deserves health care, in Xiulin just as much as anywhere else. The costs to patients are minimal. And the government has set up special programs to deliver care to the people in Xiulin and their neighbors in Hualien County.

In the 1990s, Taiwan did what has long been considered impossible in the US: The island of 24 million people took a fractured and inequitable health care system and transformed it into something as close to Sen. Bernie Sanders’s vision of Medicare-for-all as anything in the world.

There’s clearly a need for lessons. Compared to the rest of the developed world, America spends more money on health care and produces worse outcomes. By one advanced metric — mortality for causes that should be avoidable with accessible, high-quality health care — the United States ranked last among the G7 countries in 2016. America’s infant mortality rate is almost double that of some of its peers. Nearly one in 10 Americans lack insurance. People go bankrupt over medical bills. Yet Americans still spend about twice as much money on health care per capita as the average comparable country.

No health care system is perfect. But most of America’s economic peers have figured out a way to deliver truly universal coverage and quality care. The United States has not.

“Canada and virtually all European and Asian developed nations have reached, decades ago, a political consensus to treat health care as a social good,” health care economist Uwe Reinhardt wrote in his book Priced Out shortly before his death in 2017. “By contrast, we in the United States have never reached a politically dominant consensus on the issue.”

Taiwan made its choice in the 1990s and embraced single-payer. It has required sacrifice: by doctors who believe they’re forced to see too many patients every day; by patients with complex and costly conditions who can’t always access the latest treatments; by citizens who have been asked from time to time, and will be asked again, to pay more for their health care than they did before.

The national government would eventually fast-track the implementation of the new system to 1995, hoping to get the chaotic transition period over before the first popular elections in 1996. There was plenty of skepticism leading up to it. Industry, experts, and the public alike doubted the program would succeed. Labor protesters threw paper money traditionally used in a funerary rite when the legislature passed the single-payer bill in 1994. A majority of people in Taiwan disapproved of the single-payer plan when it took effect.

But the program’s reputation quickly improved once people started to enjoy its benefits. Approval has dipped (when premiums were hiked in the 2000s) and risen (when the rural health care program that employs Tien in Xiulin was implemented) over the years, but there has always been a solid baseline of support. Today, approval of the national health insurance program hovers near its all-time high, over 80 percent. The system endures 25 years after it was established.

Part of its appeal is its simplicity. Everybody in Taiwan is insured through the National Health Insurance Administration (NHIA). They receive an ID card as proof of coverage, which also stores their medical records. The Taiwanese program runs with extraordinary efficiency: About 1 percent of its funding is spent on administration, according to a 2015 review by Cheng. (Compare that to the US, where researchers have estimated that private insurers spend around 12 percent of overhead, and hospitals spend around 25 percent on administrative work.) Experts say Taiwan’s advanced IT infrastructure deserves a good share of the credit.

The benefits are quite comprehensive: hospital care, primary care, prescription drugs, traditional Chinese medicine. Patients must make copays when they visit the doctor or fill a prescription or go to the ER, but they are generally low, 360 NTD (about $12) or less. Lower-income patients are given an additional break on their cost-sharing obligations. Higher-income patients can take out private insurance for certain things not covered by the single-payer program.

The system is mostly funded by payroll-based premiums, with contributions from workers and their employers, supplemented by more progressive income taxes and tobacco and lottery levies. Premiums have been raised twice in the past 18 years to cover the growing cost of the program. The most recent rate increase in 2010 moved the payroll income tax rate from 4.55 percent to 5.17, a 14 percent increase.

In the early 2000s, again at Reinhardt’s recommendation, Taiwan converted to global budgets to pay for health care as another cost-control measure. This means that every year, government officials and private providers sit across a table and negotiate rates for services, with an annual cap set on the total payments to hospitals and doctors that the government will make. Health spending has stayed flat in recent years as a percentage of GDP, and it is growing at a slower rate in Taiwan than in the United States.

“That’s the essence of universal health coverage,” he says. “The principle of health [as a] human right is that everybody regardless of geography, religion, gender, age should have the right to access.”

January 9, 2020

I also want self driving cars.

Filed under: Cartoons, Economics, Health, Memes, News, Political, Questions, Science — Scottie @ 07:44

January 8, 2020

Adam and Steve

Filed under: Cartoons, Funny Stuff, Gender, Memes, Questions, Reason, Religion, Science — Scottie @ 11:23

January 1, 2020

EPA blows off objections from Trump-appointed scientists to make polluting groundwater easier

Filed under: Criminal, Earth News, Fascism, Greed, Health, News, Political, Questions, Science — Scottie @ 06:35

EPA blows off objections from Trump-appointed scientists to make polluting groundwater easier

An advisory board filled with scientists who were mostly appointed by President Donald Trump is objecting to new rules from the Environmental Protection Agency that will lower fuel efficiency standards and make it easier to pollute groundwater.

The Washington Post reports that the EPA is set to blow off objections from its own Scientific Advisory Board, which released analyses on Tuesday claiming that the new regulatory decisions were not based on sound science.

For example, the board argues that a rollback of a rule that limits what kind of dredging or pesticide applications can be used near streams and wetlands “neglects established science” showing that these kinds of activities can end up polluting drinking water supplies.

December 27, 2019

mental impairment

Filed under: Cartoons, Health, Memes, News, Political, Questions, Reason, Science — Scottie @ 10:54
image

The vulgarity is the design.

December 26, 2019

Is anyone surprised by this?

Filed under: Criminal, Earth News, Fascism, Greed, News, Political, Questions, Science — Scottie @ 06:28

Some observers believe the disappearance of TOXMAP is connected with President Donald Trump’s rollbacks of environmental policies set forth by the Obama administration.

“TOXMAP’s end accords with a larger pattern spanning federal environmental agencies whose intentions have been far from quiet, even loudly trumpeted,” read a December article from the Environmental Data & Governance Initiative (EDGI). “The dismantling of such a usable public platform connecting health and environmental data certainly accords with the EPA’s own declared strategies, of seeking to exclude so many environmental health studies from policy-making and to neglect or defund on-going environmental health investigations.”

“Whether these parallels are intentional or not, our National Library of Medicine has now joined this administration’s ideologically-driven anti-science crusade,” the article continued, “effectively shrinking the public’s access to environmental as well as disease and mortality data.”

“As with so many other fronts in the Trump Administration’s interlocking wars against science and environmental regulation,” EDGI added, “the prevailing hope seems to be that pushing the facts out of sight will diminish Americans’ concerns about the environment.”

December 8, 2019

Deliberately dumbing down the US

December 3, 2019

What Trump has actually done in his first 3 years

https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2019/12/2/20970521/trump-administration-achievements

The scandals, the leaks, the outrages, and the bizarre tweets of the last three years can distract from an important fact about President Donald Trump: He has changed policy in ways that affect the lives of millions of Americans.

Some of the Trump agenda is standard for a Republican president. White-collar criminal prosecutions have hit a 33-year low. The Justice Department defends state laws that could kick thousands off the voting rolls. The National Labor Relations Board is now more sympathetic to employers than unions. And military spending is on track to reach the same levels as during the height of the Iraq War.

But he’s gone further. While the media, understandably, focuses on Trump’s many scandals, his administration has quietly enacted a far more aggressive agenda than his Republican predecessors. Big boosts to fossil fuel production have come at the expense of an unprecedented deterioration in air quality. Tens of thousands of people have lost health insurance by administrative fiat, and millions are in the process of losing their nutritional assistance through the same mechanism. He’s remade the judiciary, installing conservative judges at twice Obama’s pace, and he’s consolidated a conservative majority on the Supreme Court that may endure for decades.

Much more at the link above.  Hugs

 

 

November 29, 2019

Ohio bill orders doctors to ‘reimplant ectopic pregnancy’ or face ‘abortion murder’ charges

Filed under: Criminal, Fascism, Health, News, Political, Questions, Religion, Science — Scottie @ 12:02

An ectopic pregnancy is a life-threatening condition, which can kill a woman if the embryonic tissue grows unchecked.

In addition to ordering doctors to do the impossible or face criminal charges, House Bill 413 bans abortion outright and defines a fertilized egg as an “unborn child”.

It also appears to punish doctors, women and children as young as 13 with “abortion murder” if they “perform or have an abortion”. This crime is punishable by life in prison. Another new crime, “aggravated abortion murder”, is punishable by death, according to the bill.

November 28, 2019

Not putting them in or on children was apparently nowhere on the debate agenda.

Filed under: Atheism, Cartoons, Memes, Questions, Religion, Science — Scottie @ 06:47

November 19, 2019

Joe Biden Says He Won’t Legalize Marijuana… OK Boomer

Filed under: Criminal, Drugs, Fascism, Health, News, Political, Questions, Science — Scottie @ 04:54

November 17, 2019

America’s wilderness is for sale

Filed under: Criminal, Earth News, Fascism, Greed, History, Nature, News, Political, Questions, Science — Scottie @ 14:26

John Oliver on transgender

Filed under: Cartoons, Health, LGBTQ, Reason, Science, Sex, Transgender news — Scottie @ 06:09

November 16, 2019

The corruption of knowledge. Placing feelings-based opinion (aka “faith”) on the same level as rigorous investigation and scrupulous justification

Filed under: Children, Criminal, Education, Fascism, News, Political, Questions, Religion, Science — Scottie @ 06:45

November 15, 2019

Reality and science

Filed under: Cartoons, Ideas, Memes, Reason, Science — Scottie @ 15:36

Thumbnail

November 13, 2019

Let’s talk about impeachment, being uncomfortable, and saving lives….

Filed under: Bigotry, Children, Gender, LGBTQ, Political, Questions, Science, Sex, Transgender news — Scottie @ 18:29

November 12, 2019

And they know how to prove shit. How do you like your chances

Filed under: Cartoons, Memes, News, Questions, Reason, Religion, Science — Scottie @ 06:47
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